New Zealand’s national air conditioning policy has been dubbed the “air conditioner paradox”.

    The policy aims to limit the use of air conditioning for everyone, but not for those who are more sensitive to cold weather.

    New Zealand’s National Air Conditioning Policy (NACP) comes into effect in March 2020 and applies to all homes.

    It requires everyone in New Zealand to have air conditioning installed by 2020 and to be able to access it at least once a week.

    However, many people in New England are still using air conditioning and the policy is causing confusion among some New Zealanders.

    “A lot of people in the country are still running air conditioners in their homes, but it’s a little hard to explain why,” said the New Englander, who wishes to remain anonymous.

    “When we have to change rooms, they’re running air conditioning.”

    Air conditioning is a common heating and cooling appliance, used in homes and offices, hotels and schools.

    “There’s a lot of misconceptions around the policy, and the people who are running it, they don’t really understand why,” he said.

    New Englander said his family was one of those people.

    “I live in New Hampshire, and our house has two air conditioning units,” he explained.

    “They’re the one that’s on the roof and we have an air conditioner in our room.”

    The policy says those who live in houses with air conditioning will have to have it installed by the end of 2020.

    “For everyone else, you can go and have it by the same date, so you’re not affected,” he added.

    “If you’re on a lower income level, it may not be as costly to have that air condition, but people on a higher income may not.”

    Some New Zealand homes are equipped with air conditioning but not enough.

    “The government is very good at letting people have air condition,” the New Englishman said.

    “But they’re not giving people the opportunity to go to the shops, or to use the internet.”

    Topics:government-and-politics,climate-change,air-conditioning,climate,environment,climate change-action,social-media,government-office,environmental-policy,health,social,new-zealand,nsw,nauru,australiaContact Andrew MacdonaldMore stories from New Zealand

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